Permissions attached to a data source

A data source can not only be public, or private. It can also be shared with specific users, and even allow some to edit this data source. Here after are the roles a user can have regarding a data source, and what possibility come with each role.

Note that when a data source is changed, its owner is notified, according to his/her settings.

Roles

Owner

The owner of the data source can see all information, and make all possible changes, such as:

Editor

An editor of the data source can deeply changes the data source, such as:

Although, an editor cannot:

  • See the list of viewer/editor

  • Delete the data source

  • Transfer ownership to an other user

Viewer

A viewer of the data source can not edit it. A viewer can:

A viewer cannot:

  • Edit anything

  • See the list of viewer/editor

When a data source is public, any users are considered as viewers.

Curator

A curator can perform changes on public data sources even if he/she is not an editor of the data source. The mission of a curator is to keep naming between viruses, hosts coherent, but also edit data source details when needed.

Although, an curator cannot:

  • See the responses, and thus cannot edit them either

  • Edit the mapping

  • See the list of viewer/editor, and thus cannot edit it either

  • Delete the data source

  • Transfer ownership to an other user

Permissions with viruses, hosts, and responses

Permissions of a user regarding a host/virus/response come from the permissions this user have with the data source associated.

Let us consider a virus, if a user can see it, it means that this virus is associated with a data source which can be seen by this user. So does for hosts, and/or edition.

If a user can see a response, it obviously is because this response is in a data source visible to the user.

Consequences of someone editing a virus/host

Let us consider a virus MyT4 present in multiple data source (ds_1, ds_2, …, ds_n). If an owner/curator/editor of one of this data source (ds_1) decide to rename this virus MyT4 into T4, all responses formerly associated to MyT4 in d_1 are now associated to T4 in d_1, but only in d_1. It means that MyT4 is still associated to data source ds_2, …, ds_n.

digraph G {
     dsp [label="Public data source"]
     ds_1 [ color=blue ];
     ds_2
     ds_3 [label="..."]
     ds_n
     ds_1 -> MyT4;
     ds_2 -> MyT4;
     ds_3 -> MyT4;
     ds_n -> MyT4;
     dsp -> T4;
 }

Before

digraph G {
     dsp [label="Public data source"]
     ds_1 [ color=blue ];
     ds_2
     ds_3 [label="..."]
     ds_n
     ds_1 -> T4 [ label=" Only edited link"; color=red ];
     ds_2 -> MyT4;
     ds_3 -> MyT4;
     ds_n -> MyT4;
     dsp -> T4;
 }

After